Ep86 - Sweet Country

It's our final episode of the season and in response to a request from one of our listeners Andrew Peirce (www.thecurb.com), we discuss the powerful outback western Sweet Country. Directed by Warwick Thornton and inspired by the true events, the film is a brutal indictment of the colonial terrorism that forged modern Australia and the specific impact on Aboriginal existence, identity and culture. The film invokes the mythos of the Western in aesthetic terms yet it is also a revisionist project that doesn't shy away from a pointed critique of European expansion and its corollary: uncompromisingly violent, white masculinity. Beautiful and terrifying we would definitely recommend watching the film before coming to our discussion.

We also reflect on our highlights of the season and Neil discuss new BFI releases of classic features and shorts by female filmmakers including Margaret Tait, Germain Dulac, Lois Weber, Dorothy Arzner and Alice Guy Blaché. Thanks for your continued support, and well be back in the autumn. 

Ep 85 - Canons & Cinephilia (w/So Mayer & Girish Shambu)

The latest episode sees The Cinematologists going deep on some of the central conversations in contemporary film culture, joined by the peerless So Mayer & Girish Shambu. 

Coinciding with So's 'A Queer Toolkit for Blowing Up The Canon' talk at HOME in Manchester, and Girish visiting the UK for the Queer & Feminist Cinephilia Workshop at the University of Birmingham, Neil talked to them both about canons, cinephilia and the responsibility of cinephiles in the current moment.

Following that conversation, Neil and Dario share their thoughts on the state of current online discourse and share their vulnerabilities about their place in it, coming back to the sanctuary of the podcast as a space that feels positive and discursive and does good work in promoting positive cinephilia and opening up the conversation to and about different voices.

Many thanks to So and Girish for their time and incredible wisdom and thoughtfulness. It's an honour to feature such important and inspiring film thinkers on The Cinematologists.

Girish Shambu - Time's Up For The Male Canon

Girish Shambu - For A New Cinephilia (A Manifesto)

So Mayer on Twitter

Girish Shambu on Twitter

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On the episode So and Girish shout out some colleagues and people doing great writing and publishing that captures the essence and spirit and tone of the work of New Cinephilia and challenging the canon. Here's where listeners can find them:

Another GazeCleo JournalMAIMaggie HennefeldDevika GirishVeronica FitzpatrickKelley DongMiriam BaleAlissa WilkinsonMonica CastilloPamela HutchinsonErika BalsomElena Gorfinkel

Also listen on:

iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/gb/podcast/the-cinematologists-podcast/id981479854?mt=2

Website: www.cinematologists.com

PlayerFM: https://player.fm/series/series-2416725

Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0RjNz8XDkLdbKZuj9Pktyh

Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/cinematologists


Ep82 - Children of Men

Clive Owen & Clare-Hope Ashitey

Clive Owen & Clare-Hope Ashitey

The year is 2027, the world has collapsed but Britain soldiers on. Alfonso Cuarón's Children of Men has seemingly only increased in significance and appreciation since its release in 2006. Based loosely on a P.D. James novel Cuarón imagines a world that has lost hope because of human infertility but this only the narrative starting point for an aesthetically and thematically layered dystopian nightmare. Discussion of the film's many social, cultural and political elements sometimes takes away from the fact it is a brilliant piece of action cinema with an aesthetic immediacy and depth of world-building, that has become a signature of Cuarón's filmmaking.

We screened the film at Kings College London and would like to thank PhD Student Joseph Jenner for organising the event and co-presenting the screening with Dario.

Show notes

Why Children of Men has never been as shocking as it is now - Nicolas Barber (BBC)

Humanity Adrift: Race, Materiality, and Allegory in Alfonso Cuarón's Children of Men - Zahid R. Chaudhary (Camera Obscura)

Future Shock - Abraham Riesman (Vulture)

Why Alfonso Cuarón's anti-Blade Runner looks more relevant than ever - Stephen Dalton (BFI)

The Child to Come: Life After the Human Catastrophe - Rebekah Sheldon

Listen on:

iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/gb/podcast/the-cinematologists-podcast/id981479854?mt=2

Website: www.cinematologists.com

PlayerFM: https://player.fm/series/series-2416725

Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0RjNz8XDkLdbKZuj9Pktyh

Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/cinematologists

Eps 77, 78 and 79 - Berlinale 2019 (Parts 1, 2 and 3)

Episode 79

The final episode of our Berlinale trilogy is a continuation of Neil’s travels around the German capital watching films and talking to filmmakers and critics, and a culmination of Neil and Dario’s reflections on the festival and the films they both saw. The pair discuss Andre Hörmann’s Chicago boxing documentary Ringside and the episode also features some of Neil’s interview with the filmmaker as well as a section of his chat with Kim Longinotto, whose film Shooting The Mafia Neil and Dario discussed in the first Berlinale episode. Neil also shares his thoughts on the PJ Harvey documentary A Dog Called Money, the Colombian genre-bender Monos, the Kino Lorber revival of Bette Gordon’s Variety and the finally revealed to the world concert film masterpiece that is Amazing Grace.

Film critics sharing their time and reflections on this episode are Rhys Handley, Ian Mantgani and Kambole Campbell.

Thanks to everyone whose contributions have made these three episodes possible including, and maybe especially, Kingsley Marshall of Film at Falmouth.


Episode 78

Part 2 of the Berlinale trilogy sees Neil and Dario discuss film festival podcasting, the films Baracoa and BAIT to coincide with interviews conducted by Neil with the filmmakers behind those films, Pablo Briones and Jace Freeman, and Mark Jenkin respectively. The episode also features Neil’s chats with film critics Elle Haywood, Ella Kemp, Neil Young, Megan Christopher and Steph Watts. Finally, the episode also features Neil’s in the moment reflections on a number of films he saw.

The films discussed in this episode are:

Baracoa (Pablo Briones, The Moving Picture Boys)

BAIT (Mark Jenkin)

I Was At Home, But (Angela Schanelec)

The Souvenir (Joanna Hogg)

Varda by Agnès (Agnès Varda)


Episode 77

We are really excited to put out the first of three special episodes covering the 2019 Berlin Film Festival which both Dario and Neil attended in a kind of tag team configuration. Having applied for a press pass for the Cinematologists, and because he was taking 40 his Film at Falmouth students to the festival, Neil organised a whole raft of interviews with directors and critics which form parts 2&3 of our Berlinale coverage. Dario made a last minute decision to go for the opening weekend, so this first episode consists of 3 mini reports of each day's events and then a rather bleary-eyed catch-up with Neil recorded when he arrived after midnight on Sunday. The films discussed in this episode are:

Rebels of the Neon God (Tsai Ming-Liang, 1992)

Shooting The Mafia (Kim Longionotto)

Serendipity (Prune Nourry)

Out Stealing Horses (Hans Petter Moland)

Light of My Life (Casey Affleck)

Systèm K (Renaud Barret)

Der Boden Unter den Füben [The Ground Beneath my Feet] (Marie Kreutzer)

Part 2 of the Berlinale trilogy sees Neil and Dario discuss film festival podcasting, the films Baracoa and BAIT to coincide with interviews conducted by Neil with the filmmakers behind those films, Pablo Briones and Jace Freeman, and Mark Jenkin respectively. The episode also features Neil’s chats with film critics Elle Haywood, Ella Kemp, Neil Young, Megan Christopher and Steph Watts. Finally, the episode also features Neil’s in the moment reflections on a number of films he saw.

The films discussed in this episode are:

Baracoa (Pablo Briones, The Moving Picture Boys)

BAIT (Mark Jenkin)

I Was At Home, But (Angela Schanelec)

The Souvenir (Joanna Hogg)

Varda by Agnès (Agnès Varda)


Below, please find the extended versions of filmmaker interviews conducted by Neil at Berlinale 2019:

Baracoa co-directors Pablo Briones and Jace Freeman (representing The Moving Picture Boys)

Ringside director Andre Hörmann

Shooting The Mafia director Kim Longinotto

Ep75 - 2018 Review

you-were-never-really-here-joaquin-phoenix-1108x0-c-default.jpg

In our final episode of 2018, we look back over the cinematic year and discuss the movies that have impressed, affected and stayed with us. We came up with the list independently but there are specific films and themes that emerge, particularly the fact that we both chose Lynne Ramsey's You Were Never Really Here as our film of the year. We hope you enjoy this look back and a big thank you to our audience for the continued support. We look forward to discussing more cinematic delights in 2019.

Dario's top 5

1. You Were Never Really Here (Lynne Ramsey)

2. Cold War (Pawel Pawlikowski) 

3. Shoplifters (Hirokazu Kore-eda) 

4. First Reformed (Paul Schrader)

5. Lean on Pete (Andrew Haigh)

 

Neil's top 5

1. You Were Never Really Here (Lynne Ramsey)

2. Phantom Thread (Paul Thomas Anderson)

3. Zama (Lucrecia Martel)

4. First Reformed (Paul Schrader)

5. The Dreamed Path (Angela Schanelec)

 

Other Recommendations

The Favourite (Yorgos Lanthimos)

The Guardians (Xavier Beauvois) 

Loveless (Andrey Zvyagintsev)

The Old Man and the Gun (David Lowery)

Lek and the Dogs (Andrew Kotting)

American Animals (Bart Layton)

Milford Graves Full Mantis (Jake Meginsky)

Outside In (Lynn Shelton)

The Image You Missed (Donal Foreman)

Leave No Trace (Debra Granik)